Monday, March 21, 2016

Highly Sensitive - Profundamente Sensível

 

I'm overwhelmed by this presence... As I learn to stay with my core, your gentle smile enters my eyes, your approach fills my cracks with joy and my breathing has changed since I saw it for the first time... The highly sensitive understands what's not said, feels what's underneath, pulses thick and thin with the wave patterns of every encounter... 
Pulling from every direction is this sound, this presence in every little gesture pulling and saying; -I'm there and you're here...

"We’ve been on a roll since
Your breath first graced my skin
This fire unfolds steadily
It keeps me warm within"

On my mind, the still picture of your face isn't so still... It has told me many stories and convinced me to trust your guiding, it has kept me company, every night, just before I fall asleep.
And when I wake up every morning, it invites me to reconsider my old habits and to remember who I am...


-Dja Pierce

Early Monday - Segunda-Feira Bem Cedo



Com Amor, Dja

Thursday, March 17, 2016

Saint Patrick's Day - Dia De São Patrício

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools


To support the famine relief effort, British tax policy required landlords to pay the local taxes of their poorest tenant farmers, leading many landlords to forcibly evict struggling farmers and destroy their cottages in order to save money. (Sketch: The Irish Famine: Interior of a Peasants Hut)
“Wear green on St. Patrick’s Day or get pinched.” That pretty much sums up the Irish-American “curriculum” that I learned when I was in school. Yes, I recall a nod to the so-called Potato Famine, but it was mentioned only in passing.
Sadly, today’s high school textbooks continue to largely ignore the famine, despite the fact that it was responsible for unimaginable suffering and the deaths of more than a million Irish peasants, and that it triggered the greatest wave of Irish immigration in U.S. history. Nor do textbooks make any attempt to help students link famines past and present.
Yet there is no shortage of material that can bring these dramatic events to life in the classroom. In my own high school social studies classes, I begin with Sinead O’Connor’s haunting rendition of “Skibbereen,” which includes the verse:
… Oh it’s well I do remember, that bleak
December day,
The landlord and the sheriff came, to drive
Us all away
They set my roof on fire, with their cursed
English spleen
And that’s another reason why I left old
Skibbereen.
By contrast, Holt McDougal’s U.S. history textbook The Americans, devotes a flat two sentences to “The Great Potato Famine.” Prentice Hall’s America: Pathways to the Present fails to offer a single quote from the time. The text calls the famine a “horrible disaster,” as if it were a natural calamity like an earthquake. And in an awful single paragraph, Houghton Mifflin’s The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People blames the “ravages of famine” simply on “a blight,” and the only contemporaneous quote comes, inappropriately, from a landlord, who describes the surviving tenants as “famished and ghastly skeletons.” Uniformly, social studies textbooks fail to allow the Irish to speak for themselves, to narrate their own horror.
These timid slivers of knowledge not only deprive students of rich lessons in Irish-American history, they exemplify much of what is wrong with today’s curricular reliance on corporate-produced textbooks.
First, does anyone really think that students will remember anything from the books’ dull and lifeless paragraphs? Today’s textbooks contain no stories of actual people. We meet no one, learn nothing of anyone’s life, encounter no injustice, no resistance. This is a curriculum bound for boredom. As someone who spent almost 30 years teaching high school social studies, I can testify that students will be unlikely to seek to learn more about events so emptied of drama, emotion, and humanity.
Nor do these texts raise any critical questions for students to consider. For example, it’s important for students to learn that the crop failure in Ireland affected only the potato—during the worst famine years, other food production was robust. Michael Pollan notes in The Botany of Desire, “Ireland’s was surely the biggest experiment in monoculture ever attempted and surely the most convincing proof of its folly.” But if only this one variety of potato, the Lumper, failed, and other crops thrived, why did people starve?
Thomas Gallagher points out in Paddy’s Lament, that during the first winter of famine, 1846-47, as perhaps 400,000 Irish peasants starved, landlords exported 17 million pounds sterling worth of grain, cattle, pigs, flour, eggs, and poultry—food that could have prevented those deaths. Throughout the famine, as Gallagher notes, there was an abundance of food produced in Ireland, yet the landlords exported it to markets abroad.
The school curriculum could and should ask students to reflect on the contradiction of starvation amidst plenty, on the ethics of food exports amidst famine. And it should ask why these patterns persist into our own time.
More than a century and a half after the “Great Famine,” we live with similar, perhaps even more glaring contradictions. Raj Patel opens his book, Stuffed and Starved: Markets, Power and the Hidden Battle for the World’s Food System: “Today, when we produce more food than ever before, more than one in ten people on Earth are hungry. The hunger of 800 million happens at the same time as another historical first: that they are outnumbered by the one billion people on this planet who are overweight.”
Patel’s book sets out to account for “the rot at the core of the modern food system.” This is a curricular journey that our students should also be on — reflecting on patterns of poverty, power, and inequality that stretch from 19th century Ireland to 21st century Africa, India, Appalachia, and Oakland; that explore what happens when food and land are regarded purely as commodities in a global system of profit.
But today’s corporate textbook-producers are no more interested in feeding student curiosity about this inequality than were British landlords interested in feeding Irish peasants. Take Pearson, the global publishing giant. At its website, the corporation announces (redundantly) that “we measure our progress against three key measures: earnings, cash and return on invested capital.” The Pearson empire had 2011 worldwide sales of more than $9 billion—that’s nine thousand million dollars, as I might tell my students. Multinationals like Pearson have no interest in promoting critical thinking about an economic system whose profit-first premises they embrace with gusto.
As mentioned, there is no absence of teaching materials on the Irish famine that can touch head and heart. In a role play, “Hunger on Trial,” that I wrote and taught to my own students in Portland, Oregon—included at the Zinn Education Project website— students investigate who or what was responsible for the famine. The British landlords, who demanded rent from the starving poor and exported other food crops? The British government, which allowed these food exports and offered scant aid to Irish peasants? The Anglican Church, which failed to denounce selfish landlords or to act on behalf of the poor? A system of distribution, which sacrificed Irish peasants to the logic of colonialism and the capitalist market?
These are rich and troubling ethical questions. They are exactly the kind of issues that fire students to life and allow them to see that history is not simply a chronology of dead facts stretching through time.
So go ahead: Have a Guinness, wear a bit of green, and put on the Chieftains. But let’s honor the Irish with our curiosity. Let’s make sure that our schools show some respect, by studying the social forces that starved and uprooted over a million Irish—and that are starving and uprooting people today.

Love, Dja

Monday, March 14, 2016

Patidos Políticos - Political Parties

Enquanto estivermos divididos por partidos políticos ou de qualquer outra forma, continuaremos profundamente divididos como seres, nesta realidade humana...
-Dja Pierce

While we are divided by political parties or otherwise, we will continue deeply divided as beings in this human reality...
-Dja Pierce
Love, Dja

Thursday, March 10, 2016

You are - Você é


You are not what you do. You are not what you don’t do.

You are not the job title. You are not a labeled societal sub group.
You are not your personality;
You are not a happy person, a depressed person or an angry person.
You are not a definition of your own qualities.

Who are you? 
You are not who your mother says you are.
You are not who your best friend says you are.
You are not your own descriptions of yourself.

Drop all the labels, titles, designations, descriptions, accomplishments and even failures.

Below the labels, beneath the layers, on the most subtle level…

What do you feel?
What is left?
What is there?

Who are you?

If you are not what you do,
If you are not what others say you are,
If you are not a set of descriptions,
Who are you?
Lets move a little deeper.

You are not defined or confined by the limits of your physical body.
You are not your beating heart, you are not your breath.
You are not your mind, emotions or thoughts.
If you are not all these “things”…
Who are you?
A better question may be not who are you, but what are you?

Take a deep breath into every cell of your being. As you exhale release all the labels, all the descriptors, titles, both other and self created. Bask in this space.
What are you?
Close your eyes and feel your way to it. Don’t define it, don’t put it into words, but feel it completely.
Do you feel a sense of spaciousness, of limitlessness, of infinite potential?
If you are not all or any of these things, if you can not be defined or put into words, but only felt.
What are you?
Remember who, or better yet, what you really are.
Remember your potential, remember your limitless possibility.
Remember that you can not be defined, by self or other.
Remember what you are, where you come from and why you’re here.
Remember your knowingness, your awareness, remember your truth.
What are you?

You are the awareness of all these things.
You are embedded deep within yet extend far beyond.
You are the driving force of all these things.
You are both the wave and the ocean.
You are both the dance and the dancer.
You are both the creator and the container.
You are me as I am you.

Love, Dja

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Pensamentos de Mulheres - Women Thoughts





 
Don't let anyone marginalize your feelings or your value.
Love, Djanine♥
Não deixe que ninguém marginalize os teus sentimentos e o teu valor.
Com Amor, Djanine♥

Our Choice - Nossa Escolha


Love, Dja

Monday, March 7, 2016

Sustainable Energy - Energia Sustentável

There is no place to go, no excuse to not take responsibility and participate in the clean up. We have done "impossible" things in the past, it should have thought us that when we put our minds to it, we will find and receive our miracles... This is calling for healing, not only the healing of the ocean, but our own....
Love, Dja
Não há nenhum lugar para ir que não seja 'estar aqui'. Não desculpa para não compartilhar desta responsabilidade e participar da limpeza. Nós fizemos coisas "impossíveis" no passado, deveria ter-nos ensinado que, quando colocamos nossas mentes em direção da cura, vamos encontrar e receber os nossos milagres ... Este quadro apresentado na forma está pedindo cura, não só a cura do oceano, mas a nossa íntima e profunda cura pessoal que é a 'do mundo'....  
Com Amor, Dja.

Friday, March 4, 2016

Good Things - Coisas Boas

Love, Dja

Water - Água

An Indigenous Approach to Healing with Water

HealingWaterFeature

For the Desana people, speaking to the Water is a key to healing

In recent years many people have been captivated by the images of Dr Masaru Emoto, showing the world how intention may have the capacity to affect water on a structural level. For the first time we were able to clearly visualise what a particular intention, such as gratitude, may look like in the form a single snowflake-like structure, photographed under a microscope.
The list of different photographs that could be taken using this technology is endless, as people have been purposefully affecting water with their intention, or recognising the unique subtle qualities of different water sources throughout human history. The Christian tradition is the obvious example with the ongoing performing of rituals they claim turns regular water into holy water, however vibrational essences and the water from flower baths are just a few further examples of water being affected intentionally for healing purposes.
Alt text hereDr. Emoto’s water blessed by gratitude (left) and Holy Water (right)

Indigenous Healing With Water

We shouldn’t be surprised to learn that there have been cultures who have held this understanding since long before microscopes and cameras existed to show them that their prayers or intentions were having some kind of tangible effect.  Verification instead came to them in the form of efficacy in healing.  Water was charged with healing intention, and then given to someone who was sick, and when their health was restored, the practice was deemed useful and it’s use was continued. In this way, this practice has been carried through to the present day from ancient times.  One such culture which has found this practice effective is the Desana tribe who continue to reside in the Amazon on both sides of the Colombian/Brazilian border.
The practice of charging liquids, particularly herbal medicines with intention is widely practiced throughout the Amazon basin among many different language groups, most often done with whistling or song, and/or the blowing of tobacco smoke over the liquid.
Members of the Desana TribeMembers of the Desana Tribe

Imbuing Water With Healing Intention

One term used in spanish is curar, to cure – used in much the same way we use this word when referring to clay tiles curing in the sun, or salted meat being cured, inferring that the intention is perhaps preserved in the structure of the water molecules. It has a double meaning in that one cures the liquid etc. in the preserving intention sense, in order to cure the patient in the healing sense. This is likely part of why a healer in the amazon is most commonly known as a curendera or curandero: one who cures. Another term for this practice in the Amazon is icarar.
The verb icarar means to sing or whistle an icaro [medicine song] over a person, object or preparation to give it power; water over which an icaro has been sung or whistled and tobacco has been blown, for example is called agua icarada
Anthropologist Luis Eduardo Luna tells of how [mestizo shaman] Don Williams Vasquez deals with difficult childbirth, singing icaros [medicine songs] of slimy fish, demulcent and mucilaginous trees, the slippery boa, and the ray, which can give birth in any position. He sings these songs over a glass of water, which is given for the woman to drink. – Steve Beyer, Singing To The Plants
Alt text hereBlessing water with sacred tobacco

The Desana Tribe Of The Vuapes River Region

The Desana stand as a particularly good example of this practice because in their culture exists a field of specialisation in this exact art. The Desana are unique in that they have three distinct types of shamans and the ones that work with incantations, usually over liquids, are known to be capable of healing with water and intention alone. This person is referred to as a kubu or kumu.
The kumu cures by the inaudible recitation of highly formalised therapeutic spells over a liquid the patient then drinks.’ – Steve Beyer, Singing To The Plants
A term that isn’t loaded with quite the same negative connotations as ‘spells’ is the Desana word bayi, which speaks of curing in both the healing sense as well as the encoding of intention into a liquid.  Bayi also brings with it the same kind of reverence and sacredness as the word ‘pray’.
For the Desana, this object [often water], which gives the incantation a material support, functions as a “medium”; it transfers the incantation to the patient. – Domonique Buchillet, Portals Of Power
Alt text hereThe Desana Tribe of the Amazon

Why Not Simply Sing Or Speak The Incantation Over The Sick Person?

According to the kubu shamans of the Desana, their incantations when used without some kind of physical carrier like water have more precision and are able to target the exact cause of the illness with more accuracy, but work more slowly. Perhaps the effect is slower to arrive, or slower to manifest into some kind of physical change, or both.
When reciting their incantation over a physical agent like a liquid for drinking or a plant for rubbing on the person, the Desana claim that the cure is faster acting, more penetrating, has more materiality and permanence, though it not as precise.

Cultivating The Ability To Encode Water With Healing Intention

If Dr. Masaru Emoto is right then we are very likely accidentally affecting the environment around us with our thoughts and feelings every where we go, every single day – and water seems to be particularly conductive and sensitive to the emanations of our consciousness. If we wish to more actively affect the quality of the water around us the following lessons can be learned from the kubu of the Desana tribe.
The apprentice kubu, kudu pegi, is literally ‘the one who listens’. – Domonique Buchillet, Portals Of Power
Alt text hereLearning the practice of deep listening

Deep Listening

For the Desana, much of the listening required is the listening to the incantations being passed down in a lineage, so I’m sorry to say that those reading this article are unlikely to gain the powers claimed by a kubu. What we can do however is examine the qualities that they are trying to cultivate while they are learning the incantations of their ancestral line. There is a depth to the type of listening that they are trying to cultivate. The Desana speak of learning to be able to sit still on a bench that in their tradition is ‘intimately tied to thought and reflection’. Their term for intelligence is partly derived from a word that means: to listen, to hear, to comprehend, to understand, to know.
Indigenous Australians, Kalahari Bushmen in Africa, Apache Indians, Indigenous Hawaiians and many more traditional cultures place a profound level of focus on deep listening to nature. For example the Lipan Apache philosophy as taught by Stalking Wolf / Tom Brown / Jon Young, is that as we listen deeply we develop threads of connection to the living world. This could explain why deep listening allows for more powerful incantations as the person is able to call on the aspects of nature he has formed strong threads or even ropes of connection with. For more information on the cultivation of deep listening practices check out our article about the Indigenous Australian concept of ‘Dadirri’.
Alt text hereIndigenous Australians have a deep connection to nature through listening

Purification and Fasting

Another aspect of gaining knowledge and the ability to focus and transfer intention powerfully and accurately is the practice of purification and fasting. Purification through emetic plant purges apparently removes blockages preventing knowledge from coming in.
For you with your tape recorder and notebooks, it is easy to learn this incantation. For me it was very difficult. I had to fast and remain awake all night to learn it. – A Desana Kubu, Portals Of Power
One of the fundamental methods of shamanic training in the Amazon is the practice of self imposing strict limitations on diet and spending time in isolation in the forest, listening for the songs of the plants that one is trying to establish relationships with. Perhaps it is the mental and physical discipline gained from fasting that hones the ability to focus intention in a powerful way, however the deepest lessons come from actually doing the practice yourself and receiving knowledge and experience directly. If you choose to explore fasting, please do extensive research and proceed with care. Getting a checkup and speaking to your physician is advised before exploring this path.
tambo 
A modern day Tambo for isolation diets and fasting

How Is This Helpful In My Daily Life?

Whether you believe fully in the possibilities outlined in this article or whether you are a more sceptical, it can be helpful to remember that in recent studies science has found that even when a person knows they are receiving a placebo it is still effective in a statistically significant way.
So the next time you sit down to eat a meal, think of all the cultures that give gratitude for their meals and consider that almost every piece of food you are likely to eat contains water.  What would the image look like if Dr Emoto took a picture of the water in that food now charged with gratitude?  What would the image look like of the water in our body that had come into contact with this water from our gratitude charged food?
The next time you’re cooking soup for a loved one who isn’t feeling well, you could consider singing it a song that warms your heart.  When you run a bath for yourself at the end of a long stressful day, consider the affect the epsom salt crystals, the essential oils and music may be having on not only the water in the bath, but the water in your body that makes up approximately 70% of who you are.
Alt text hereWe can positively affect our water before we drink it

Healing With Water On A Global Scale

If water is extremely conductive of electricity then this conductivity could also extend to more subtle levels of energy that science is now only at the edge of being able to measure.  Remember also that water has also been observed by eastern traditions as perhaps the best example of being able to adapt and change to any situation. Conductivity and adaptability.
We may not be masters of encoding water with intention like the Desana, or masters of focus like buddhist monk, but what we lack in depth of focus we may be able to make up for with sheer volume of people. What excites me is the idea that millions of people may be able to collectively use their intention to take advantage of the conductivity and adaptability of water, by coming into a space of deep listening and receptivity and then focusing our intention on sending their blessing to the waters of this planet. This may be to bring healing to the waters themselves, but like this practice of using the water as a carrier for healing individuals, a large enough and focused enough collective may be able to bring about healing or re-alignment in not just the water but all those who come into contact with it – and there is nothing this planet needs more than that.

By Jonathan Davis on Tuesday March 1st, 2016

Love, Dja

Thursday, March 3, 2016

One Voice - Uma Voz

 Truly Touched...


Love, Dja

Não Apago Nada - I Erase Nothing

Eu não apago nada nesta minha vida.
Cada coisa, cada mínima coisa, fez de mim o que sou agora. As coisas belas, ensinaram-me a amar a vida. As coisas más, a saber vivê-la.

-Bob Marley

Com Amor, Dja